Electric Fence Information & News

Types of Electric Fences | Exclusion and Containment Fencing

Posted by Patriot Chargers on

Types of Electric Fences | Exclusion and Containment Fencing

Exclusion vs. Containment Fences TRADITIONAL CONTAINMENT electric fence applications, such as those used to control cattle, horses, sheep, and goats, are primarily designed to keep these animals in a limited area. These animals are usually domesticated and are somewhat predictable. Most importantly, you are fencing these animals IN with their food source. Standard EXCLUSION fences – such as those designed to keep out bears, wolves, coyotes, deer, or feral hogs – are different from traditional electric fence applications. These animals are not domesticated, are highly unpredictable, and can be extremely dangerous. Most importantly, you are fencing these animals OUT of...

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The correct fence for your farm

Posted by Patriot Chargers on

The correct fence for your farm

The best electric fence is one that's suited to your requirements. The table below outlines the 3 main types of electric fence structures, to help you identify which type best suits your needs.     PORTABLE/TEMPORARY SEMI-PERMANENT/PERMANENT PERMANENT HIGH TENSILE Duration Of Fence Placement Short—moves frequently 1 - 20 years* 20 - 40 years* Ease Of Construction Simple and fast Easy to medium Medium. Requires special tools Recommended For Horses, cows, pets, garden and small nuisance animals Deers, horses, cows, sheep, goats, pigs, exotics (llamas, emus etc) and predators Deers, cows, sheep, goats, pigs, exotics (llamas, emus etc) and predators...

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11 Common problems when testing electric fences | Troubleshooting Electric Fencing

Posted by Patriot Chargers on

11 Common problems when testing electric fences | Troubleshooting Electric Fencing

1. Grounding Most electric fence problems are caused by poor grounding. Why? An electric fence is an electrical circuit. The electrical current travels from the charger, down the fence line, through the animal, along the earth to the ground system and back to the charger. If the ground system is inadequate, the electrical current is reduced and the animal receives a weaker shock. Tips - • The ground system should be at least 33' (10 m) away from electric or telephone ground systems to avoid interference. • Moist soil conducts electricity much better than dry soil. If possible, locate the...

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